Risk profile

Risk profile

Risk profile

The risk profile is made up of quantitative and qualitative factors. The quantitative aspect of the risk profile is described by net asset value (difference between assets and liabilities), different capital requirements and the quality, replaceability and transferability of own funds required to cover them. The quantitative aspect of the risk profile most often describes factors that are very difficult to measure, such as reliable administration, internal control and risk management, and planning and monitoring of operations.

Insured benefits can be secured from the quantitative perspective in the best way possible when

  • eligible own funds are at a sufficient level
  • eligible own funds exceed the solvency capital requirement
  • the risk position in relation to free capital (difference between eligible own funds and the solvency capital requirement) is not too high.

In a market-consistent valuation environment, risk-taking capacity is illustrated by the difference between balance sheet assets and liabilities, in which the eligibility, replaceability and transferability of balance sheet items is taken into account at the Group level, i.e. the market-consistent amount of eligible own funds. The more eligible own funds, the greater the risk-bearing capacity and the more freedom to decide which risks to bear in operations. From a quantitative perspective, risk-taking is illustrated by the solvency capital requirement required by the operations. The greater the risk, the higher the solvency capital requirement.

A closer look at the solvency capital requirement can reveal the source of the balance sheet’s risks. An understanding of the risk profile can be gained by analysing the amount of eligible own funds and the solvency capital requirement and the relationship between the two (relative solvency position). Describing the risk profile thus requires identifying and understanding all of the above-mentioned factors. The relative solvency position (eligible own funds divided by the solvency capital requirement) is not alone sufficient to describe the risk profile because the same relative solvency position can be attained in a number of different ways.

The structure of the Fennia Group’s solvency capital requirement by risk area without the loss-absorbing effect of future bonuses and deferred taxes (before loss-absorbing items) at the end of the reporting period and at the end of the previous reporting period is presented below.

Solvency Capital Requirement (EUR million)

31.12.2018

Contribution

Share

31.12.2017

Contribution

Share

Change

Market risk

381.2

360.4

71.1 %

474.7

458.6

78.3 %

-93.5

Counterparty risk

52.7

24.7

4.9 %

36.9

15.0

2.6 %

15.8

Underwriting risk

141.4

88.6

17.5 %

145.2

82.8

14.1 %

-3.8

Intangible asset risk

0.0

0.0

0.0 %

0.0

0.0

0.0 %

0.0

Operational risk

31.7

31.7

6.3 %

28.4

28.4

4.8 %

3.4

Capital requirement for other financial sectors

1.5

1.5

0.3 %

1.0

1.0

0.2 %

0.5

Diversification

-101.5

-----

-----

-100.4

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-1.1

Solvency Capital Requirement before loss-absorbing items

507.0

507.0

100.0 %

585.9

585.9

100.0 %

-78.9

        

31.12.2018

ENG FR Riskiprofiili t

OtsikkoOsuus
Market risk0.7109399916
Underwriting risk0.1747730491
Operational risk0.062597445
Counterparty risk0.0487679429
Capital requirement for other financial sectors0.0029215714

31.12.2017

ENG FR Riskiprofiili t-1

OtsikkoOsuus
Market risk0.7828225409
Underwriting risk0.1413526667
Operational risk0.0484302592
Counterparty risk0.0256375804
Capital requirement for other financial sectors0.0017569529